10 Memorable Pieces of Literary Advice from Twitter

Over the years, Twitter has grown from just being a social network to a platform bursting with amazing ideas, brilliant opinions and a source for knowledge and learning. We find new perspectives and insights in tweets and threads and the literary sphere is not absent from all of this. Some of the best pieces of literary advice on writing and for writers this year are contained in tweets and threads.

In no particular order, these are 10 pieces of literary advice from Twitter that we can not forget.

1. Roxanne Gay on how to succeed as a writer and the myth of overnight success:

In this thread, one of the most influential writers of the year, Roxanne Gay, articulates her journey as a writer and how much work has gone into getting to where she is today. She reminds writers that the journey may be difficult, but never impossible.

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You can read the full thread here

2. J.K Rowling on rules of writing:

When a follower asks J.K Rowling, award winning author of the Harry Potter Series, amongst others what the rules of writing are for writers, she brilliantly replies with a truth writers need to hears – the only rule is what works for you. 

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Read the rest of the thread here.

 

3. Akwaeke Emezi on finishing your book manuscript

Starting a book can be relatively easy, but following through to the end is one of the hardest things. Recognising that this is a common struggle for writers, Akwaeke Emezi, author of soon to be released Freshwater (which will be published by Grove Atlantic in the U.S. and Farafina in Nigeria), breaks down her writing process, telling us how she finishes her book manuscripts and completes general goals.

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Read full thread here.

4. Matt Haig on reading

If there’s one thing you also are as a writer, it’s that you’re a reader. Before many of us became writers, we were first readers and being a writer shouldn’t change that. Matt Haig, author of Reasons to Stay Alive and a constant number one best selling author reminds us in one of the most beautiful threads this year on the power of books and the magic in reading.

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Read full thread here.

5. Carmen Maria Machado on advice to her younger self

We really can’t overemphasise the importance of reading for writers and Carmen Maria Machado, fiction writer, critic, and essayist whose work has appeared in the New YorkerGranta and elsewhere hammers on this in her tweet. For her, if she could go back in time and advice herself as a young writer, this is what she would say:

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See tweet here

6. Abubakar A. Ibrahim on advice to aspiring writers

Abubakar Ibrahim, award winning author of Season of Crimson Blossoms, gives sublime advice to aspiring writers in this tweet. If you’re looking to grow and develop as a writer, hold on to these words.

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7. Nnedi Okorafor on reading for pleasure

Still on reading (are you still in doubt of how important it is for you to read as a writer?), Nnedi Okorafor, international award-winning novelist of African-based science fiction, fantasy and magical realism, and author of Zahrah the Windseeker reminds writers of the importance of reading for pleasure and the ability to enjoy writing in this thread.

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8. Rae Chang on Filtering

Ever heard of filtering? We too, until we read Rae Chang’s thread on it. She is a young adult political fantasy writer, and editor who breaks down extensively what filtering is and how it affects your writing. If you’re looking to learn a thing or two as a writer or editor, read the full thread here.

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9. Nayyirah Waheed on the value of words.

Nayyirah Waheed, poet and author who has been described as one of the most famous poets on Instagram, reminds us in this tweet that our words, no matter how little can be valuable. So just write.

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10. Christopher Paolini on writing advice

Christopher Paolini, author of The Inheritance Cycle, sums up major advice for writers in this tweet. Figuring out how to go about writing can be confusing, but Christopher reminds writers to plan ahead, understand and move accordingly. The story will fall into place.

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There you have it! Did we miss out anything? What piece literary advice resonated with you this year? What do you wish you learnt earlier as a writer? Let us know.

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Before You Send Out Your Manuscript

Dear Writer,

Writing is an act of self-exploration and submitting your work to a publisher can be the scariest act of your life. As publishers, we are aware of this and sympathetic. In the event that we select your work for publication, we would do our very best to make the process pleasant for the writer.

However, to increase the chances of your manuscript being picked up by a publisher, we advise that you adhere to the rules of grammar, punctuation and submission.

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Before You Send Out Your Manuscript

Some mornings, we log into the submissions account and there are hundreds of emails waiting to be read, most of them with manuscript excerpts. Unfortunately, our request for more hours in a day hasn’t been granted (yet), so we can’t afford to waste any of the 24 we get. If you are a writer submitting your work to a publishing house, here’s how you can make our lives (and the lives of other editors and editorial assistants) easier.

Do Not Show Off

Contrary to what your friends and family members might have told you, you’re not the best writer since Shakespeare or Soyinka. But even if you are extremely talented, we won’t read your manuscript unless your email contains a synopsis of your novel and an excerpt of reasonable length (we suggest three chapters). We do not want to read a list of every award you’ve won since Primary School. We know every book we’ve published; don’t list them in your email or tell us that your work is better than those of seasoned authors. Allow us to judge that.

The moment we see emails like the one below, we know we won’t download or read the submission.

“If kachifo would like peharps, a demonstration, i would e-mail them my worst poem and they will be bewildered by beauty and admiration my stock of quality can give. I do not beg because i know writers like me would catapault the industry. My goal: to exceed Ngozi Adichi, ECHEBE, WOLE SOYINKA and to messure above SHAKESPARE and MILTON. Please e-mail me! (Sic)”

Do Not Send Your First Draft

Do as much work as you can in cleaning up your manuscript before sending it in. Does your story flow? If we can’t make sense of it, we won’t read past the first paragraph or chapter. Spell check! It doesn’t say much about your commitment to the written word if your manuscript is riddled with grammatical errors.

Send a Synopsis

Besides doing all the work you can on your manuscript, do even more on your synopsis – it often determines if your manuscript will be read or not. We rarely spend more than a minute on each email. In that minute, we read the synopsis and decide if we should download the manuscript excerpt or not. Do not send your manuscript without a synopsis, and do not send your synopsis without a manuscript. Both are important! And please, do not send a link to your blog, telling us to read your works there. We can, but we will not.

Obey Instructions

Often, submission guidelines request that you send in a synopsis, and attach an excerpt from your work to the email. Your synopsis can be sent in the body of the email (we prefer this), but do not send your sample chapters in the body of the email. We don’t have the time or inclination to copy text from the body of an email into a Word document for offline reading. If we can’t download the excerpt for offline reading, we’ll forget about it. Save your excerpt as a Microsoft Word document and send it as an attachment to the mail. However, do not assume this is all a publisher will ask for. Every publisher is different. Find out the guidelines of the publisher you want to send your manuscript to and follow the guide to the letter! If you will not dedicate time to reading and following the guidelines, the editor will not dedicate time to reading your work.

Copy Editor vs. Fairy God Editor

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We are copy editors, not fairy god editors. There are no fairy god editors waiting in the wings, dedicated to turning ALL writers’ rags into fine cloth. We won’t edit your story and send it back to you “even if it won’t be published.” Also, it’s very unlikely that we’ll to send you an email when we are done reading your excerpt just to tell you what we didn’t like about it… jeez. There are simply too many submissions and like we said, there aren’t enough hours in the day.

So if you don’t get a response within 8 weeks, it means Kachifo will not be publishing your work under our Farafina imprint but we wish you all the best.

Here are our submissions guidelines:

To have your work considered for publication by Kachifo Limited, please send an email to submissions@kachifo.com, including a strong excerpt of about three chapters or 10,000 words saved in Microsoft Word, a one-page synopsis of the work, and a short author bio. (Note that a synopsis is not the same as a blurb or a teaser. A synopsis should contain ‘spoilers’, and should give a summary of the entire story, including and especially how it ends.)

The sample of the manuscript should be properly formatted (double-spaced, left-justified only, 12pt Serif font). Our preferred font is Courier New.

Introduce yourself and your work in the query letter in the body of the email. The subject of your email should be the title of your manuscript followed by the word “Submission”. Your submission will be acknowledged and assessed by our editors. We will respond within eight weeks if we are provisionally interested in publishing your work.

At this time, Kachifo Limited is not accepting unsolicited poetry or non-fiction submissions. The submissions window will be re-opened on the 31st of December, 2017.

Please note that we only accept submissions via email to submissions@kachifo.com. We do not accept hard copy submissions.

Unsolicited submissions sent to other Kachifo email addresses may be overlooked. Hard copy submissions will not be acknowledged or returned.

Please see the FAQs or email submissions@kachifo.com for further information on how to publish with us.

If you would like to know more about Prestige, our publishing services imprint, visit www.prestige.ng

All the best!

Intimate Portraits: A Selection of Five Essays

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Image by Kristi Bonney

There has been a remarkable and continuous upsurge in the creative non-fiction genre coming out of Nigeria in recent times arguably giving us some of the best literary works this year.

Catapult, one of the literary platforms telling the stories of extraordinary writers, published in the course of the year essays by five writers who we are proud to say are alumni of the Farafina creative writing workshop; a testament to the beauty that comes out year in year out after each year’s rigorous experience.

These essays are some of the most intense, thought provoking personal essays we have come across. The writers have immersed us in their intimate writings, from which we share excerpts below.

We Need to Talk about Snails by Tola Rotimi – (class of 2014)

“The day I confessed to being a witch I had no idea what I was doing.”
A couple of months ago, while researching examples of prose poems to share with my creative writing class, I came upon the poem “Snails” by the French poet Francis Ponge. They are heroes, Ponge says of snails, beings whose existence alone is a work of art. In a dream later that night, I was back in Lagos, in the marsh surroundings of my childhood church, foraging under the cover of night, wading through wet grass as tall as little boys’ chins. I was alone then not alone, my younger brothers were away then suddenly appearing.

We were children again, the three of us. All the world was in slow motion…

Read the full essay here.

 

How to Gossip about African Writing in Geneva by Oris Aigbokhaevbolo (class of 2014)

“…In the early months of 2016, I visited Switzerland. At the airport, hungry or eager to see this old country new to my eyes, I bought a bunch of bananas for a few Swiss francs. I yelped inside after converting to naira. Back in Lagos, on any given day, you could find me haggling with a lady selling better bananas under the Computer Village bridge. If the bargaining process is a battle of wills, ours was attended by jokes and mock horror from the start. Some days I win and have for trophy a black bag laden with a bunch or two. Other days I feel I have parted with too much for unworthy loot. On a few occasions, nobody wins: She doesn’t make the sale; I leave empty-handed.”

Read the full essay here.

The Things We Never Say: A Family History by Amara Nicole Okolo (class of 2015)

“I first experienced love in the arms of my mother on a Sunday morning. I stood beside the rose bushes, watching my father slowly drive out of the garage. One year, seven months. She came from behind, plucked a lone pink rose from the bushes, still dripping with dew, and tucked it in the hair around my right ear. Then she circled her hands over my shoulders and chest in a warm hug.

Twenty-eight years later, my mother will die on a hospital bed, her left hand clasping mine.”

Read the full essay here.

Ógbuágu: The Lion’s Killer Depression by Keside Anosike (class of 2014)

“In Igbo, Ogbuagu literally translates to “a lion’s killer.” It doesn’t entirely suggest cruelty, but bravery. It is the highest title that can be given to a person in Igbo land, and reserved only for the strong, the brave—those who walk into a lion’s den without saying goodbye to the people they left at home.

I began to know my mother in my early adult life. Before then, what I knew of her was in a stream of memory so thin it was difficult to distinguish it from imagination. Her body in a wedding dress, laying eyes closed in something metallic on four wheels, right in the center of our living room in Mbieri…”

Read the full essay here.

 

Don’t Let It Bury You by Eloghosa Osunde (class of 2015)

I know the sound of my mother’s voice better than I know anything else. As a child, I didn’t like the way the soft and smooth of it could explode into a growl in sudden seconds, shouting and overheating the house, sending my small anxious heart darting through my body, displaced. I never liked how it fractioned my breathing and slowed my movements into a drag. But I liked that it always prepared me for trouble, at least. I like that it helped me get ready.

Read the full essay here.

‘Freshwater’ by Akwaeke Emezi on ‘Best Books of 2017’ list

Freshwater, the eagerly anticipated debut novel by Akwaeke Emezi was recently listed as one of The Guardian’s ‘Best Books of 2017’.

Freshwater will be published by Grove Atlantic in the U.S in February 2018, and by Farafina in Nigeria in June 2018.

New York Times bestselling author of ‘Ghana Must Go’ , Taiye Selasi, describes Freshwater as ‘…sexy, sensual…’.

 

Image from akwaeke.com

Praise for Freshwater:

“Freshwater is a clarion call to those of us who find that our minds are more haunted and complex than that of the status quo. In exquisite, unearthly prose, Akwaeke Emezi renders the ordinary strange and the strange, ordinary—making Freshwater the most stunning debut novel I’ve read in years. An unforgettable literary experience.””

— Esmé Weijun Wang, author of ‘The Border of Paradise’, winner of the Graywolf Nonfiction Prize, and one of Granta’s Best Young American Novelists.

“In Emezi’s remarkable debut novel, Freshwater, we enter the lives of our protagonist, starting in Nigeria and ending in the United States. Every page is imbued with radiant prose, and a chorus of poetic voices. With a plot as alive and urgent as it is relatable, Freshwater is also solidly its own, brims with its unique preoccupations. Never before have I read a novel like it — one that speaks to the unification and separation of bodies and souls, the powers or lack thereof of gods and humans, and the long and arduous journey to claiming our many selves, or to setting our many selves free.”

— Chinelo Okparanta, author of ‘Happiness Like Water’ and ‘Under The Udala Trees’, winner of 2014 and 2016 Lambda Literary Awards, and one of Granta’s Best of Young American Novelists.

More information on the author website here.

 

 

Farafina releases three new books this November

Kachifo Ltd is pleased to announce the release of three new books – What It Means When A Man Falls From The Sky (Nigerian edition), How to Win Elections in Africa and Anike Eleko under its Farafina, Kamsi and Tuuti imprints.

The three titles were released on 13th November 2017 and are available on online platforms and in selected bookstores nationwide.

The Books

WHAT IT MEANS WHEN A MAN FALLS FROM THE SKY by Lesley Nneka Arimah When a man

The collection of short stories, which was shortlisted for the 2017 Caine Prize for writing, boasts of powerful storytelling, unique female protagonists, and a world where women are depicted as the center of the society.

Reviews:

From Tendai Huchu, author of The Hairdresser of Harare, and The Maestro, The Magistrate & The Mathematician:

“Arimah has a gift of crafting intimate familial relationships . . . and the pressures and strains of those relationships form the most intricate and astonishing narratives. The powerful stories in this dark and affecting collection will show you that magic still exists in our world.”

From Chinelo Onwualu, editor of Omenana Magazine: “Masterfully moving between the speculative to the mundane, this is a riveting read that will stay with you long after you’ve put it down.”

From Igoni A. Barrett, author of Blackass and Love Is Power, or Something Like That:

“From the very first story in What It Means When a Man Falls from the Sky this thunderstruck reader began to glean the answer to the question embedded in the book’s title. . . Lesley Nneka Arimah has landed in my rereading list like a blast of fresh air.”

About the Author

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Lesley Nneka Arimah’s work has received grants and awards from Commonwealth Writers, AWP, the Elizabeth George Foundation, the Jerome Foundation and others. Her short story, What It Means When A Man Falls From The Sky was shortlisted for the 2017 Caine Prize for African Writing. She currently lives in Minneapolis.

 

ANIKE ELEKO

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Àníké has to hawk ẹ̀kọ every morning but that does not stop her from going to school. She loves school and wants to be a doctor. However, her mother has decided her fate: once she finishes primary school, she will join her Aunt Rẹ̀mí in the city as a tailor.

When a mystery guest visits Àníké’s school, she has the chance to win a scholarship that will change her fate. Will the help of her friends Oge, Ìlérí and Àríyọ̀ the cobbler be enough?

Written by Sandra Joubeaud and illustrated by Àlàbá Ònájìn, ÀNÍKÉ ELÉKO tells a colourful story of one girl’s courage in the face of opposition to her dreams.

About the Authors

sandra joubeaudSandra Joubeaud is a French screenwriter and script doctor based in Paris, France. She has also worked on Choice of Ndeye, a comic book commissioned by UNESCO and inspired by the novel, So Long a Letter (Mariama Ba).

 

 

Alaba Onajin is a graphic novelist with a diploma of Cartooning and Illustration from alabaMorris College of Journalism, Surrey Kent. His work includes The Adventures of Atioro, and other collaboration projects with UNESCO and Goethe Institut. He lives in Ondo State, Nigeria.

 

 

 

HOW TO WIN ELECTIONS IN AFRICA

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Democracy involves the process of changing custodians of power from time to time in order to maintain a useful equilibrium of performance and accountability. But the post-colonial narrative in most African countries has been one of strongmen and power brokers entrenching themselves deeply across the crucial levels of society. The past few years have however seen citizens become more aware, and some revolt against these systems.

How To Win Elections in Africa explores how citizens, through elections can uproot the power structures. Using examples from within and outside Africa, this book examines the past and present to map a future where the political playing field is level and citizens can rewrite existing narratives.

Politicians have been handed their notice: It is no longer business as usual.

About the Authors

Chude Jideonwo is the managing partner of RED, which brands include StateCraft Inc, chudeRed Media Africa, Y!/YNaija.com and Church Culture. His work focuses on social movements shaking up and transforming nations through governance and faith, with the media as a tool. He teaches media and communication at the Pan-Atlantic University. In 2017, he was selected as a World Fellow at Yale University.

 

Adebola Williams is the co-founder of RED and chief executive officer of its debolacommunication companies – Red Media Africa and StateCraft Inc. A Mandela Washington Fellow under President Barack Obama, he has been a keynote and panel speaker at conferences across the world including at the London Business School, Wharton, Stern, Yale, Columbia, Oxford and Harvard.

 

 

 

You can get the 3 books at these bookstores:

PAGE Book Connoisseurs, Allen Avenue
Patabah Books, Shoprite Mall, Surulere
CSS Bookshop, CMS, Lagos
Quintessence, ParkView Estate, Ikoyi

To order:
Buy Anike Eleko on Konga here 
Buy What It Means When A Man Falls From The Sky on Konga here 
Buy How To Win Elections In Africa on Konga here 

Against the Run of Play – exclusive excerpt

 

Against the Run of Play takes an intense look at Nigerian politics at a time when an entrenched political party was defeated in a presidential election after 16 unbroken years in power. This book offers the reader a narrative explanation and an unusual insight into the major human and institutional factors that led up to the defeat of President Goodluck Jonathan  in 2015.

Equally important is the author’s detailed recall of the major political developments that made the outcome inevitable while shaping the very expectations that brought President Buhari to power. Adeniyi enhances the credibility of his narrative through an extensive set of interviews with living key players in the drama he relates. The hindsight of these key players throws the events into bolder relief and illuminates the road ahead. Read an excerpt from the book below. 

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If there is one issue on which the former President has serious misgivings, it is in the conduct of the 2015 general election and the disposition of the then INEC National Chairman, Prof. Attahiru Jega, whose neutrality Jonathan calls to question. “I was disappointed by Jega because I still cannot understand what was propelling him to act the way he did in the weeks preceding the election. As at the first week in February 2015 when about 40 percent of Nigerians had not collect­ed their PVCs, Jega said INEC was ready to go ahead with the election. How could INEC have been ready to conduct an election in which millions of people would be disenfranchised?”

According to Jonathan, even when he had a meeting with Jega to express his reservations about the preparedness of INEC, Jega was still adamant that they were ready and that the election would go ahead. “Of course the Americans were encouraging him to go ahead yet they would never do such thing in their own country. How could we have cynically disenfranchised about a third of our registered voters for no fault of theirs and still call that a credible election? The interesting thing was that the opposition also supported the idea of going on with an election that was bound to end in confusion.”

Jonathan, however, defended his government’s postponement of the election, maintaining that it was for security reasons. “When the military and security chiefs demanded for more time to deal with the insurgency, the reasons were genuine. As at February 2015, it would have been very difficult to vote in Gombe, Adamawa, Borno and Yobe States. But the moment all the arms and ammunition that had been ordered finally arrived, the military was able to use them to degrade the capacity of Boko Haram to the level in which they posed no threat to the election,” he explained.

On the huge sums of money allegedly taken by his National Se­curity Adviser, Col. Sambo Dasuki (retd.) in what has been dubbed in the media as the ‘Armsgate’ scandal, the former President demurred, saying he would not speak on it, since the matter was already before the court.

However, if there is anything that pains the former president, it is the way he says his wife and some officials of his administration are being treated by the Buhari administration. “I feel sad about the way my family is being hounded,” he lamented. “Society is like a building. You build it one block at a time. If every president decides to go in to dismantle what his predecessor did, society will never make progress. I expected President Buhari to correct whatever mistakes I may have made and then carry on from there. But a situation in which people go into exile for political reasons is not good for us.

According to Jonathan, Buhari had a good opportunity to instil a new order with the anti-corruption campaign that brought him to power and which resonated during the campaign. “His style of fight­ing corruption is different from mine and since most Nigerians appar­ently prefer his style, it is okay. There are steps you take that will help in retrieving ill-gotten wealth and punish offenders while restoring confidence in the system. But there are also things you can do to dam­age the system.”

Having shared with me his own concise review of what transpired at the election, Jonathan said he had seen enough to convince him that even if he had been declared winner, the bond of trust had been bro­ken between him and several people within his government. “I felt re­ally betrayed by the results coming from some northern states. Perhaps for ethnic purposes, even security agents colluded with the opposition to come up with spurious results against me. You saw the way the In­spector General of Police, a man I appointed, suddenly turned himself into the ADC to Buhari immediately after the election.”

The former president said he had projections before both the 2011 and 2015 presidential elections and he was sure of what would happen in each of the zones yet could still not fathom what happened in some states in 2015. “How could we have lost Ondo, Benue and Plateau States if our people were committed to the cause? If you ex­amine the results, you will see a pattern: in places where ordinarily we were strong, our supporters did not show enough commitment to mo­bilize the voters.” Jonathan expressed disappointment at some former allies, naming some names. “What happened was very sad not for me as a person, but for our democracy,” he admitted. “Take for instance, the PDP National Chairman, Alhaji Adamu Mu’azu. I believe he joined in the conspiracy against me. For reasons best known to him, he helped to sabotage the election in favour of the opposition.”

 Against the Run of Play by Olusegun Adeniyi will be launched in Lagos tomorrow after which copies will be available in bookstores across the country. You can also place orders here

Ebook is currently available on okadabooks and Amazon.

For sales/distribution enquiries please call 08077364217 or email info@kachifo.com

 

#DearIjeawele, or A Feminist Manifesto in Fifteen Suggestions in stores now

From the best-selling author of Americanah and We Should All Be Feminists, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, comes a powerful new statement about feminism today—written as a letter to a friend.

Dear Ijeawele contains fifteen invaluable suggestions–compelling, direct, wryly funny, and perceptive–for how to empower a daughter to become a strong, independent woman. From teaching a young girl to read widely and recognise the role of language in reinforcing unhealthy social norms; encouraging her to choose a helicopter, and not only a doll, as a toy if she so desires; having open conversations with her about appearance, identity, and sexuality; criticising cultural norms surrounding marriage; and debunking the myths that women are somehow biologically designed to be in the kitchen, and that men can “allow” women to have full careers, Dear Ijeawele goes right to the heart of sexual politics in the twenty-first century. It will start a new and urgently needed conversation about what it really means to be a woman today.

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Join the photo campaign. Share a quote that resonates with you using the hashtag #DearIjeawele

Dear Ijeawele will be available at the sales outlets listed below.

LAGOS

  1. Quintessence Bookshop, 1 Park View Lane, Ikoyi (08026992535)
  2. Patabah Bookstores, Adeniran Ogunsanya Shopping Mall, Surulere (08038303777)
  3. Laterna Ventures, 1, Okoawo Street, VI (08057377916)
  4. JED Megastores, The Palms, Lekki (09083365228)
  5. The Booksellers, 2, Oweh Street, Near Waec Office, Yaba (08063450173, 08066723368)
  6. Glendora Bookstores, Jazz Hole, Ikoyi (07060648580)
  7. Glendora Bookstores, MM2, Ikeja (08033047091)
  8. Roving Height (07032038633)
  9. Sunshine booksellers (08028708577)

 

PORT HARCOURT

  1. Chapters bookshop Ltd, 46, Ekenewon Street, (Whitneys) (08033097255)
  2. Books Affairs Edu. Services (08184452488)

Other Locations

  1. Ebitare Bookshop, BAYELSA (08037931949)
  2. Mustapha Bookshop, KADUNA  (08036446655)
  3. Lara Bookstores, University of Ilorin, KWARA STATE (08027812337)
  4. Ajayi Crowther University, OYO (08141127107)
  5. The Booksellers, 52, Magazine Road, Jericho, IBADAN, OYO (08033229113, 08078496332)
  6. The Booksellers, City Plaza (Ground Floor), Area 11 Garki II, ABUJA FCT (08033110679,08136590888)
  7. The Booksellers, 44, Quarry Road Opposite Anglican High School, Junction, Ibara Abeokuta 08143284461
  8. Roving Heights (07032038633)
  9. Sunshine booksellers  (08028708577)
  10. @TheBookDealerNG (Twitter and Instagram)
  11. Konga

 

For enquiries about distribution or placing large orders (500+ books) please send an email to info@kachifo.com or call 08077364217.