Non-Fiction Is What You Need. We Can Prove It.

Non-fiction isn’t boring.

Perhaps you found it difficult to read before now, but the problem is not exactly with the genre itself.

A simple solution for you would be to seek out non-fiction with themes you already enjoy in fiction, such as crime, race, human rights, feminism etc.

Fiction and non-fiction are not as different as you think when you look closely. The latter can be narrated just as creatively as the former.

We also imagine that you are, perhaps, a big fiction reader who simply wants to switch up her reading preferences.

Wherever you fall, this blogpost is for you!

We curated a list of non-fiction essays, all with varying and intriguing themes, to start you off on your non-fiction-reading journey.

1. My Secondhand Lonely by Zoe Gadegbeku

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In this baring article, Gadegbeku reveals the thin, and sometimes transparent, line between having it all together and social isolation. First published in Slice , and later in LongreadsMy Secondhand Lonely leaves you with the knowledge of a phenomenon we may have never considered before now.

Read the full essay here.

2. Home by Ope Adedeji

Where is home? What is home?
In her riveting three-part essay, Ope Adedeji leaves no emotion undescribed. She reveals where, to her, home is —  and where it isn’t.
Read the full essay here.

3. Finding Binyavanga by Sada Malumfashi

Binyavanga Wainana is set to attend a literary evening in Kaduna.
Sada Malumfashi, a Kaduna-based writer looks forward to this, but he knows little of  how his life will change because of this event.
An enchanting essay about falling further in love with Northern Nigeria’s history and, of course, of finding what makes Binyavanga tick.

Read it here.

4. Nigeria: The Trouble of Nigerian Culture Writing by Oris Aigbokhaevbolo

In this didactic article, Oris Aigbokhaevbolo draws attention to the declining quality in journalistic writing by popular ‘culture curators’.
This article draws lessons from the drama which ensued after an article published on The Pulse website about rapper, M.I. Abaga, escalated into a full-blown shouting match on the website’s Loose Talk podcast.
Read the full story here.

5. The Shea Prince by Frankie Edozien

Journalist and author of Lives of Great Men, Frankie Edozien, dazzles in this piece about a journey to Ghana that marks the start of an unclear and intense friendship.

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Published in adda stories, this essay revolves about the author’s friendship with Will, a native of dry, dusty Tamale in Ghana.

Will is old-school, married with children, easygoing. But one thing he  struggles to accept, however, is the strong chemistry between him and the writer.

Read the full essay here.

6. Who Will Claim You by Akwaeke Emezi.

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Published by Commonwealth Writers, this essay confronts the realities of being a product of different cultures.

Emezi asks questions in this essay: ‘Is [belonging] a birthplace, a passport, a childhood? and ‘Can you claim a people with enough force that they claim you back?’ She explores questions on belonging that we may never have answers to.

Here’s an excerpt:

Read the full story here

 

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