Photos: The Release of the Nigerian Edition of Americanah

Chimamanda reading from Americanah

Chimamanda reading from Americanah

The audience

The audience

Chimamanda in conversation with Tolu Ogunlesi

Chimamanda in conversation with Tolu Ogunlesi

The audience

The audience

Chimamanda

Chimamanda

In Conversation

In Conversation

Question from a member of the audience

Question from a member of the audience

Question from a member of the audience

Question from a member of the audience

Adebola Rayo, Chinaku Onyemelukwe, Okey Adichie

Adebola Rayo, Chinaku Onyemelukwe, Okey Adichie

Question from a member of the audience

Question from a member of the audience

Chimamanda signing books

Chimamanda signing books

Chimamanda and her parents

Chimamanda and her parents

Chimamanda with Kachifo Ltd. staff

Chimamanda with Kachifo Ltd. staff

Many thanks to @obidaraphx for the photos

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AMERICANAH Lagos Book Tour

AMERICANAH by Chimamanda Adichie is now available in bookstores across Nigeria. The author will be embark on a Lagos Book Tour from the 27th of April.

AMERICANAH_Tour Schedule

Meet Chimamanda on these dates at the following locations:

April 27 at Terra Kulture by 6pm.

May 1 at Patabah Books, Shop B18 Adeniran Ogunsanya Mall, Surulere, by 1pm

May 4 at Glendora, Ikeja City Mall, by 1pm

Or catch her on the radio:

7pm, Friday 3rd May, 92.3 Inspiration FM with Wana Udobang.

9.30am, Saturday 4th May, 98.1 Smooth FM on the Breakfast show

Excerpt: Americanah

americanahFinally, Aisha finished with her customer and asked what colour Ifemelu wanted for her hair attachments.
“Colour four.”
“Not good colour,” Aisha said promptly.
“That’s what I use.”
“It look dirty. You don’t want colour one?”
“Colour one is too black, it looks fake,” Ifemelu said, loosening her headwrap. “Sometimes I use colour two, but colour four is closest to my natural colour.”
Aisha shrugged, a haughty shrug, as though it was not her problem if her customer did not have good taste. She reached into a cupboard, brought out two packets of attachments, checked to make sure they
were both the same colour.
She touched Ifemelu’s hair. “Why you don’t have relaxer?”
“I like my hair the way God made it.”
“But how you comb it? Hard to comb,” Aisha said.
Ifemelu had brought her own comb. She gently combed her hair, dense, soft and tightly coiled, until it framed her head like a halo. “It’s not hard to comb if you moisturize it properly,” she said, slipping into the coaxing tone of the proselytizer that she used whenever she was trying to convince other black women about the merits of wearing their hair natural. Aisha snorted; she clearly could not understand why anybody would choose to suffer through combing natural hair, instead of simply relaxing it. She sectioned out Ifemelu’s hair, plucked a little attachment from the pile on the table and began deftly to twist.
“It’s too tight,” Ifemelu said. “Don’t make it tight.” Because Aisha kept twisting to the end, Ifemelu thought that perhaps she had not understood, and so Ifemelu touched the offending braid and said,
“Tight, tight.”
Aisha pushed her hand away. “No. No. Leave it. It good.”
“It’s tight!” Ifemelu said. “Please loosen it.”
Mariama was watching them. A flow of French came from her. Aisha loosened the braid.
“Sorry,” Mariama said. “She doesn’t understand very well.”
But Ifemelu could see, from Aisha’s face, that she understood very well. Aisha was simply a true market woman, immune to the cosmetic niceties of American customer service. Ifemelu imagined her working in a market in Dakar, like the braiders in Lagos who would blow their noses and wipe their hands on their wrappers, roughly jerk their customers’ heads to position them better, complain about how full or how hard or how short the hair was, shout out to passing women, while all the time conversing too loudly and braiding too tightly.

AMERICANAH coming soon to bookstores near you!

To pre-order email orders@kachifo.com, call +2348077364217 or tweet at us: @farafinabooks
Price: Hardback N4500, Paperback N2500.

All About Chimamanda…

‘Adichie came almost fully made.’ Chinua Achebe

chimamanda-bio

Every great writer generates interest about their origins. Was Chimamanda’s childhood special? Is she an only child? Is she married? Could she always write so well? Our curiosity was certainly whetted…

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie was born on 15 September 1977 in Enugu, Nigeria, the fifth of six children to Igbo parents, Grace Ifeoma and James Nwoye Adichie. While the family’s ancestral hometown is Abba in Anambra State, Chimamanda grew up in Nsukka, in the house formerly occupied by Nigerian writer Chinua Achebe. Chimamanda’s father, who is now retired, worked at the University of Nigeria, located in Nsukka. He was Nigeria’s first professor of statistics, and later became Deputy Vice-Chancellor of the University. Her mother was the first female registrar at the same institution.

Chimamanda completed her secondary education at the University’s school, receiving several academic prizes. She went on to study medicine and pharmacy at the University of Nigeria for a year and a half. During this period, she edited The Compass, a magazine run by the University’s Catholic medical students.

At the age of nineteen, Chimamanda left for the United States. She gained a scholarship to study communication at Drexel University in Philadelphia for two years, and she went on to pursue a degree in communication and political science at Eastern Connecticut State University. While in Connecticut, she stayed with her sister Ijeoma, who runs a medical practice close to the university.

Chimamanda graduated summa cum laude from Eastern in 2001, and then completed a master’s degree in creative writing at Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore.

It is during her senior year at Eastern that she started working on her first novel, Purple Hibiscus, which was released in October 2003. The book has received wide critical acclaim: it was shortlisted for the Orange Fiction Prize (2004) and was awarded the Commonwealth Writers’ Prize for Best First Book (2005).

Her second novel, Half of a Yellow Sun (also the title of one of her short stories), is set before and during the Biafran War. It was published in August 2006 in the United Kingdom and in September 2006 in the United States. Like Purple Hibiscus, it has also been released in Nigeria.

Read the rest of Chimamanda’s biography here: http://www.l3.ulg.ac.be/adichie/cnabio.html

AMERICANAH coming soon to bookstores near you!

To pre-order email orders@kachifo.com, call +2348077364217 or tweet at us: @farafinabooks
Price: Hardback N4500, Paperback N2500.

 

Chimamanda Adichie: The Danger of a Single Story

“…But because of writers like Chinua Achebe and Camara Laye, I went through a mental shift in my perception of literature. I realized that people like me, girls with skin the color of chocolate, whose kinky hair could not form ponytails, could also exist in literature. I started to write about things I recognized.”

‘Fine Boys’ goes to Bayelsa

The 2nd Bayelsa Book and Craft Fair is scheduled to hold on April 18 and 19, 2013. Themed ‘Africa as One,’ the fair will host artists from several disciplines.

Image

Catch Farafina author, Eghosa Imasuen, at the Fair where he will be on two panels talking about writing, and his second book, Fine Boys.

Fine Boys tells the story of Ewaen and his friends as they navigate the treacherous waters of the Nigerian university system, even as the country spirals into political unrest. A honest, heartfelt book, Fine Boys is a must-read.

Other Nigerian authors who will be at the fair include Toni Kan, Professors Akachi Adimora-Ezeigbo, Chukwuemeka Ike, Nze Ifedigbo Sylva, Ayodele Arigbabu, Ayodele Morocco-Clarke, and Ayodele Olofintuade.

The Fair will also host Nollywood director, Charles Novia, who will launch his memoir, Nollywood Till November and speak about the joy of documentation.

Bayelsa Book & Craft Fair is the brainchild of the Africa Film Academy and Blues & Hills Consultancy.

Copies of Fine Boys will be on sale at the Fair.