‘The Maestro, the Magistrate and the Mathematician’ to launch in Edinburgh

Covers_03-03-15.cdrTendai Huchu is set to launch his new novel, The Maestro, the Magistrate and the Mathematician, in Edinburgh on October 30, 2015, as part of the Edinburgh Independent Radical Book Fair. Huchu’s outstanding novel is published in Nigeria by Kachifo Limited (under its Farafina imprint), and will be released in November 2015.

Tendai Huchu

Tendai Huchu

Also, Jeanne-Marie Jackson will be interviewing Huchu (on The Good Book Appreciation Society’s Facebook page) on his novel, in which she describes the author as crafting ‘moments of real human poignancy […], but never veers into cheap valorization of either hope or despair.’ The interview is set for November 1, 2015, and you can find more information on it here.

Forthcoming titles from Kachifo Limited

We are excited to announce our delightfully diverse list of titles to be released in November 2015. From children’s fiction to poetry and literary fiction, Kachifo Limited is sure to have something for everyone.

Afro_Okechukwu Ofili

Afro: The Girl with the Magical Hair by Okechukwu Ofili
One special girl chooses to wear her hair natural, in a land where an evil Queen makes everyone wear their hair in straight weaves. When Afro is kidnapped for her hair’s magic, it is up to her to save herself and the kingdom, with a little help from a friend she makes along the way.

About the author
Okechukwu Ofili is an author, motivational speaker and engineer. His previous books include How Laziness Saved My Life and How Stupidity Saved My Life. Afro: The Girl with the Magical Hair is his first children’s book. It is published under Kachifo Limited’s Farafina Tuuti imprint.

Covers_03-03-15.cdr

The Maestro, the Magistrate and the Mathematician by Tendai Huchu
Three very different men struggle with thoughts of belonging, loss, identity and love as they attempt to find a place for themselves in Britain. The Maestro, a depressed, quixotic character, sinks out of the real world into the fantastic world of literature. The Magistrate tries to create new memories and roots, fusing a wandering exploration of Edinburgh with music. The Mathematician, full of youth, follows a carefree, hedonistic lifestyle, until their three universes collide.

About the author
Tendai Huchu’s short fiction and nonfiction have appeared in The Manchester Review, Ellery Queen’s Mystery Magazine, Gutter, AfroSF, Wasafiri, The Africa Report, Kwani? and numerous other publications. He was shortlisted for the 2014 Caine Prize for African Writing. The Maestro, the Magistrate and the Mathematician is his second novel.

Blackass_Igoni Barrett

Blackass by A. Igoni Barrett
Furo Wariboko – born and bred in Lagos – wakes up on the morning of his job interview to discover he has turned into a white man. As he hits the city streets running, still reeling from his new-found condition, Furo is amazed to find the dead ends of his life wondrously open out before him. As a white man in Nigeria, the world is seemingly his oyster – except for one thing: despite his radical transformation, his ass remains robustly black . . .

About the author
A. Igoni Barrett is a winner of the 2005 BBC World Service short story competition, the recipient of a Chinua Achebe Centre Fellowship, a Norman Mailer Centre Fellowship, and a Rockefeller Foundation Bellagio Centre Residency. His short story collection, Love is Power, Or Something Like That, was published in 2013 by Kachifo Limited. Blackass is his first novel.

THE STRESS TEST_Mojisola Aboyade-Cole

The Stress Test by Mojisola Aboyade-Cole
It is revealed that Marine Compact Bank, run by the Johnsons, is not as healthy as it would seem. This results in a power tussle amongst the bank’s key players – Damelda Johnson, the matriarch of the Family-Johnson; Adam Okoya, a disgruntled member of staff; Damelda’s beloved stepson Felix, and Taramade Johnson, our heroine. When the dust settles, only one of them is left standing.

About the author
Mojisola Aboyade-Cole draws inspiration from her years in the banking industry. She is interested in the dynamic economic and social situations faced by females in the Nigerian financial industry. The Stress Test is her second novel. It is published under Kachifo Limited’s Farafina Breeze imprint.

It Wasn't Exactly Love

It Wasn’t Exactly Love by Farafina Trust Workshop Class 2012
It Wasn’t Exactly Love is a collection of short stories from the 2012 class of the annual Farafina Trust Creative Writing Workshop. The stories in this anthology cover a range of themes – marriage, sex and human relationships – with depth and honesty.

A Handful of Dust

A Handful of Dust by Farafina Trust Workshop Class 2013
A Handful of Dust speaks of the myriad struggles faced by contemporary Africans, with themes ranging from love and sexuality to the true meaning of home. A Handful of Dust is an anthology by the 2013 class of the annual Farafina Trust Creative Writing Workshop.

FOR BROKEN MEN WHO CROSS OFTEN_Azino

For Broken Men Who Cross Often by Efe Paul Azino
This collection of poetry is a refreshing and brilliant bond of the written and the oral, as it invents aesthetic devices to connect the two mediums which have constantly generated wide debate: spoken word and poetry-on-the-page. The author, in his writing, resonates through his themes of advocacy, love, loss, identity and history, the need for a revisit of the inner self. This book is released along with a selection of audio performances, in a Farafina first: mixed-media publishing.

About the author
Efe Paul Azino is one of Nigeria’s leading performance poets. He has performed at many of Nigeria’s foremost performance poetry venues, including Ake Arts and Book Festival, British Council Lagos, Taruwa Festival of Performing Arts, The Future Awards, Bogobiri, Lagos Book and Arts Festival and several others. For Broken Men Who Cross Often is his first poetry collection, published under Kachifo Limited’s Farafina Kamsi imprint.

Thunder Protocol_Obari Gomba

Thunder Protocol by Obari Gomba
Thunder Protocol is a mid-career oeuvre of lively and impressive poems that examine issues ranging from the personal to the global. The diversity of themes in this poetry collection is both refreshing and startling, with language that is sometimes witty and inventive, and other times reflective and simple. Kachifo takes its first stab at the world of poetry with this and Efe Paul Azino’s For Broken Men Who Cross Often.

About the author
Obari Gomba teaches Literature and Creative Writing at the University of Port Harcourt. His poetry collection, Length of Eyes, was listed by the jury of the Nigeria Prize for Literature as one of the best eleven poetry books in 2013. Thunder Protocol is published under Kachifo Limited’s Farafina Kamsi imprint.

These titles will be available in major bookshops and from online retailers nationwide from October 2015.

Selected Participants: 2015 Farafina Trust Creative Writing Workshop

The following applicants have been selected to participate in the 2015 Farafina Trust Creative Writing Workshop:

  1. NERISSA ANIDI
  2. ADAEZE EZENWA
  3. SHIELA CHUKWULOZIE
  4. EDWIN MADU
  5. ELOGHOSA OSUNDE
  6. TEMITOPE OWOLABI
  7. EMILOMO NWAFOR-OHIWEREI
  8. JOHN KARANJA  NZISA
  9. AYODEJI ROTINWA
  10. DORIS ANIUNOH
  11. ENAJITE EFEMUAYE
  12. NARO OMO-OSAGIE
  13. PHIDELIA IMIEGHA
  14. JILL MNENA  ACHINEKU
  15. NIYI ADEMOROTI
  16. AMARA NICOLE OKOLO
  17. OLORUNFEMI OWOYEMI
  18. ISAAC OTIDI AMUKE
  19. MODE ADERINOKUN
  20. OLUTIMEHIN ADEGBEYE
  21. AKWAEKE EMEZI
  22. FESTUS OKUBOR
  23. BADE AYOADE
  24. ABIODUN NKWOCHA
  25. FAREEDA ABDULKARIM

The workshop will run from June 16 to June 26, at the end of which there will be a Literary Evening open to the public.

Congratulations to the selected participants!

2015 Farafina Trust Creative Writing Workshop

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Farafina Trust will be holding a creative writing workshop in Lagos, organized by award-winning writer and creative director of Farafina Trust, Chimamanda Adichie, from June 16 to June 26, 2015. The workshop is sponsored by Nigerian Breweries Plc. Guest writers who will co-teach the workshop alongside Adichie are the Caine Prize Winning Kenyan writer Binyavanga Wainaina, National Librarian of Norway Aslak Sira Myhre, and others.

The workshop will take the form of a class. Participants will be assigned a wide range of reading exercises, as well as daily writing exercises. The aim of the workshop is to improve the craft of Nigerian writers and to encourage published and unpublished writers by bringing different perspectives to the art of storytelling. Participation is limited only to those who apply and are accepted.

To apply, send an e-mail to Udonandu2015@gmail.com. Your e-mail subject should read ‘Workshop Application.’ The body of the e-mail should contain the following:

  1. Your name
  2. Your address
  3. A few sentences about yourself
  4. A writing sample of between 200 and 800 words. The sample must be either fiction or non-fiction.

All material must be pasted or written in the body of the e-mail. Please DO NOT include any attachments in your e-mail. Applications with attachments will be automatically disqualified.

Deadline for submissions is April 30, 2015. Only those accepted to the workshop will be notified by June 2, 2015. Accommodation in Lagos will be provided for all accepted applicants who are able to attend for the ten-day duration of the workshop. A literary evening of readings, open to the public, will be held at the end of the workshop.

Financial Times/OppenheimerFunds Emerging Voices Awards 2015

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Financial Times/OppenheimerFunds present the Emerging Voices Awards 2015. The award, in its inaugural year, aims to recognise extraordinary talent in the arts, including fiction, film and art.

“There is a remarkable structural shift in the world, propelled by economic progress in the developing markets and the advanced reach of the Internet. More connectivity and greater variety of voices in the business, science and arts communities are leading to a new renaissance. The Financial Times and OppenheimerFunds are delighted to provide a platform to recognise the people contributing to these markets.”

The fiction award is open to nationals or residents of emerging nations in Africa and the Middle East. Only books first published between 1 January 2014 and 30 September 2015, and having a minimum of 20,000 words, are eligible. Entries are open until 30 April 2015, and winners in each category will be announced at a special gala on 5 October 2015. Winners in each category will receive the sum of $40,000.

For more information on entry criteria, entry categories and the awards schedule, please visit the awards website.

Review of Yejide Kilanko’s ‘Daughters Who Walk This Path’ on Brittle Paper

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The world abounds with novels about violence against women. So why should you read Daughters Who Walk This Path, Kilanko’s rewrite of a motif that has inspired everyone from Shakespeare (Rape of Lucrece) to Alice Walker (The Color Purple)?

You should because Kilanko does smart and masterful things with the genre.

It’s the 1980s in Ibadan, the city of seven hills and little Morayo is as happy as a lark. Kachi, the boy she’s been crushing on has made it clear that the feelings are mutual. Her friendship with Tomi is a source of the simple joys of childhood. Eniayo, her younger albino sister is growing up to be a lovely and chirpy little girl. Dad and mom are doing well. They’ve just moved from a rented three-bedroom flat to a new two-story complex built from scratch. But this picture-perfect world comes down in a crash one unsuspecting day. Morayo’s near blissful life is abruptly and quite savagely cut short by an act of sexual violence.

To read the full review, click here.

A. Igoni Barrett Responds to Adaobi Tricia Nwaubani’s Essay, ‘African Books for Western Eyes’

A. Igoni Barrett, author of Love Is Power or Something Like That, in his essay titled ‘Whom Do We Write For?’ gives a thought-provoking response to Adaobi Tricia Nwaubani’s New York Times piece, ‘African Books for Western Eyes’. Please read an excerpt from Barrett’s essay below:

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I published my first book in Nigeria in 2005. It was a collection of stories edited by my father and released by his one-man company. The day the printer delivered the books was memorable: imagine my eagerness as I grasped my first-ever copy, then stared at it in disappointment: dreadfully designed, atrociously typeset, abominably printed – it is still the ugliest book I’ve ever touched.

Over the next two years I distributed the books myself; hence, I know that less than one hundred copies were sold. The left-over nine hundred were handed out to anyone who didn’t refuse the gift.

In the beginning, I was convinced I could make a living from my sales. Nigeria had a population of more than one hundred million, and so one thousand books, even ones as unattractive as mine, would sell quickly. Like many self-published authors before me, I figured wrong.

By 2007 I was disenchanted enough with DIY publishing to take up a job with a traditional publisher, where I spent the next two years learning everything about why my book had failed.

I republished the book in 2008. My father supplied the money to print one thousand copies, but it was my employer that supplied the publishing manpower, albeit unofficially.

When the printer made the delivery, I was astonished that the same book could look so different. While the first edition had never found a place on my bookshelf, this one would. Even better, it would sell. I had it all figured out; I would use my employer’s distribution network.

Lagos had a population of about twenty million, and so one thousand books, especially ones as attractive as mine, would sell quickly. I did more than hope this time: I invested in publicising the book. I pitched myself to newspapers as an interview subject; I went on a book tour; I organised monthly book readings at the largest bookstore chain in Nigeria; and, finally, I resigned my job in publishing and began writing again.

The second edition of my book sold out in 2011, three years after publication. Logistical expenses guaranteed a commercial loss, exacerbated by systemic hindrances, the most infuriating being the booksellers who cheat publishers out of their sales earnings – a common practice in Nigeria.

By this time I had realised that I wanted to be a full-time writer, not a part-time publisher or a half-hearted book promoter.

What worried me was my future as a writer in Nigeria. If I’d learned anything since 2005, it was that it was impracticable for any investor to turn a profit from selling literary fiction in a market as difficult as Nigeria. All those hardscrabble years spent as a local talent had confirmed to me that success for most writers in English – whether African or Australasian or Asian – depends on the publishing powerhouses of the West, mainly in New York and London.

I knew where to go if I wanted success.

Please click here to read the full essay.