Romeo, Romeo, wherefore art thou Romeo?

gone with the wind3 days to go till Valentine’s Day! At Farafina, we are reading the poems and six word stories sent in and we are VERY excited. Thank you all for participating. Keep up the good writing!

Today, we look at some of the Farafina editors’ fave ‘boy meets girl’ renditions. There are loads of great love stories out there, but we couldn’t cover them all. A one-sentence summary of each, in no particular order:

 

1)      Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte

Boy meets girl; boy is rich and 40 years old; girl is poor and half his age.

Hmmn. A tale as old as time.

 

2)      Romeo and Juliet by William Shakespeare

Boy meets girl; their families are sworn enemies…

*Sigh* We all know what happens next.

 

3)      Gone With The Wind by Margaret Mitchell

Boy meets girl; girl rejects boy for other boy who is married.

Do you call that a love quadruple?

 

4)      The Time Traveller’s Wife by Audrey Niffenegger

Boy meets girl when he is 36 and girl is 6; boy marries girl when he is 30 and girl is 22.

What? We suck at maths but this doesn’t seem right… Read it.

 

5)      The Lion and The Jewel by Wole Soyinka

Boy meets girl and boy loves girl; girl loves bride price.

Nothing wrong with a babe who wants perks…

 

6)      Twilight by Stephanie Meyer

Boy meets girl; boy and girl fall in love; boy turns out to be vampire.

Bloody, right?

 

7)      The Hunchback of Notre Dame by Victor Hugo

Boy meets girl; boy is a hunchback, girl is a beautiful gypsy dancer.

Let’s just say Disney changed the story a lickle bit.

 

8)      Redeeming Love by Francine Rivers

Boy meets girl; girl is a prostitute.

Love does not keep a record of wrongs…

 

9)      Noughts and Crosses by Malorie Blackman

Boy meets girl; boy is white, girl is black. Enough said!

 

10)   The Story of Beautiful Girl by  Rachel Simon       

Boy meets girl; boy is deaf and girl has developmental disability.

Well, they say love is blind.

                       

Tell us what you think of our selection and tweet us a one-sentence summary of your favourite love story.

To keep track of our e-love blog fest, visit: https://farafinabooks.wordpress.com/2013/02/04/write-me-a-love-letter/

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