Price slash for Power, Politics and Death

Good news! You can now get your paperback copies of Power, Politics and Death, the groundbreaking book on the life of the late President Umaru Musa Yar’Adua, for only N2,500!

Power, Politics and Death is an exposé by Olusegun Adeniyi that provides an insider’s account of the late President Yar’Adua’s life—as a man and as Nigeria’s president—as never told before. Adeniyi, spokesman for the late president, describes Yar’Adua’s time in office with an honesty that is clear and heartfelt.

Power, Politics and Death was published in December 2011, and has been very well-received. However, Kachifo Limited has decided to slash the price of the paperback from N5,000 to N2,500 to make this highly significant book accessible to more readers. So grab your copies as soon as possible!

Please send an email to orders@kachifo.com or call +234807 736 4217 to order your copies. Meanwhile, enjoy this excerpt from Power, Politics and Death.

The first indication I got that the president might actually be on his way back to the country came via an SMS after my phone beeped at 6:00 p.m. on Tuesday, November 23, 2009. It was from Omoyele Sowore of saharareporters. He had information that the president had left the hospital and was in fact at the Saudi airport on his way back to Nigeria, he wrote.

Although there had been hints from my previous discussions with the CSO and ADC of their possible return within the week, I had been told similar tales on several occasions, to the extent that I had become weary and no longer considered it serious. But I thought it wise to check. Naturally, my first move was to dial the Saudi line of the ADC. It had been switched off. Then I tried his Nigerian mobile numbers (which were roamed), and they were also inaccessible. Next, I tried the CSO also on all his mobile lines but got the same results.

Sensing that the story might be true after all, I tried the Saudi numbers of the security details attached to the president, and when I could not reach any of them, I concluded that surely the president was indeed on his way back to Nigeria this time. Given the political situation in Nigeria at the time, the illness of the president, and his continued stay in Saudi Arabia had caught the attention of the cable networks, most of which had detailed their correspondents in Saudi Arabia to monitor the situation. It was therefore no surprise that the moment the president left the hospital, they immediately alerted their correspondents in Nigeria.

At the presidential villa, it was also not difficult for State House correspondents to guess that the president was on his way home, especially when troops from the Brigade of guards began moving towards the airport. Implicitly, all the plans contrived in Saudi Arabia by the handlers of the president to make the movement a secret

affair had become futile. Nothing could be more ironic. By the time the chartered air ambulance and the presidential jet arrived at the Abuja international airport a few minutes apart at about 1:45 a.m., the vicinity was swarming with several pressmen, and CNN, with a camera hidden in the surrounding bush, was able to capture the arrival. Like most Nigerians, I also watched the sad episode live on CNN as one of the aircraft was made to stop in the middle of the tarmac while an ambulance was driven to the plane to evacuate the president. Even though the evacuation was so expertly done as to obscure any glimpse of it from the camera, I sensed trouble because what was happening could only mean one thing: the president was brought back home still sick.

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