Comic Book Superheroes & Nigerian Politics

American Superheroes

Captain America, Wonder Woman, Superman, Batman, Spider-man. What effect did American superheroes have on the psyche of American society?

Comic books are more than agnostic art, the history of comic books in the USA and particularly of action comics since World War II show that comics can be a medium for political expression. For many years comics have been use to tell the American story and more subtly to promote certain political and social agendas; from war to peacetime politics, from rights movements to changing social norms.

Marvel Comics recently announced the release of a new comic series with a Muslim-American girl as the teenage superhero.

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Kamala Khan, new Muslim-American superhero by Marvel Comics

During the Golden Age of comics (1938 to 1950) comics were used to bolster support for Allied forces against the Axis forces. American comic book companies showcased heroes such as Captain America prevailing over the Axis Powers like Adolf Hitler. Superman and Batman, star-spangled Wonder Woman, The Shield and Captain America were all hugely popular during World War II and most US presidents since the Golden Age have featured one way or another in mainstream superhero comics. 

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Wonder Woman

And for good reason. Danny Fingeroth, author of  Superman on the Couch: What Superheroes Really Tell Us about Ourselves and Our Society thinks he know why comic book superheroes have continued to matter so much to so many of us over the past several decades. He defines a hero as “someone who rises above his or her fears and limitations to achieve something extraordinary…a hero embodies what we believe is best in ourselves”. More so superheroes who have fantastic powers, strength of character and a system of positive values, and a will of steel to defend those values. If ever there was a society that needed the kind of subliminal reconditioning that superheroes can offer it would be Nigeria – today.

That’s what Farafina and Nigerian comic book buff will be discussing today, 5.30pm at a public roundtable discussion at the Bogobiri Festival. Details are:

Venue: Bogobiri, 9, Maitama Sule Street off Awolowo Road (near Falomo), South-West Ikoyi, Lagos

Date: Sat 9th Nov 2013

Time: 5.30pm – 6.45pm

Theme: “Comic books, graphic novels and patriotism: Can Nigerian comic books influence society and politics?” 

Panel includes Yona Oyegun-Masade (moderator) of Farafina, publishers of Abraham Oshoko’s June 12: Annulment , Adeniran Adeniji publisher of Uhuru Comics and Ibrahim Ganiyu illustrator of June XII comics.

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Right after the open discussion (which takes place in the Bogobiri Gallery), Keziah Jones, in concert, launches his latest album, ‘Captain Rugged’, aptly inspired by the comic book culture. You don’t want to miss either event.

4 thoughts on “Comic Book Superheroes & Nigerian Politics

  1. Hi,my name is Mutiu Idowu am an artist and i have started drawing a comic of mine but is as nt been publish yet or been see by a professional artist but it have been commented by many,still i would love it if a professional artist could contact me on facebook (Mutiu Idowu) or call me (08179333359) to met or see it and comment on it,thanks for reading

  2. Hi,my name is Mutiu Idowu am an artist and i have started drawing a comic of mine but is as nt been publish yet or been see by a professional artist but it have been commented by many,still i would love it if a professional artist could contact me on facebook (Mutiu Idowu) or call me (08179333359) to met or see it and comment on it,thanks for reading

  3. Kudos to Farafina. I am deeply interested in you. I also have a manuscript that included a comic conversation between my characters in a court room to exposes the evil of Judges. The manuscript is so fine but sadly enough you did not publish plays.

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